Pupil Premium

 

About Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support particular groups of pupils who are known to be at risk of underachievement and close the attainment gap between them and their peers. The Pupil Premium is allocated to schools for pupils, in Years R to 11, who are known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM) or who have been eligible for FSM in the past six years (Ever 6). Pupil Premium is also allocated for children who have been looked after by the local authority.
The Pupil Premium was £935 per pupil in 2014/15 and is set to remain the same for 2015/16. A premium is also paid for children whose parents are currently in the Armed Forces. In 2013/14 the premium was £300. Pupils looked after by the Local Authority receive a premium of £1,400.
More information about the Pupil Premium is available on the Department for Education website:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/pupil-premium-information-for-schools-and-alternative-provision-settings

Our School

Hamilton Lodge School and College educates children and young people between the ages of 5 and 19. All children and young people who attend HLSC have a hearing impairment and many have an additional educational need.

How we use the pupil premium

Children and Young People for whom the school receives PP are rigorously assessed to determine the areas of difficulty they are experiencing. These difficulties may not simply be educational but also social and emotional. We use the PP to fund additional support which addresses these needs and can demonstrate a positive impact on their educational and emotional development. These are some of the ways we have been using Pupil Premium:

  • Delivered additional wellbeing support to pupils who have emotional
  • Arranged specific activities to support social integration and emotional wellbeing during out of school hours.
  • Provided additional literacy support via the Speech & Language Therapy Assistant
  • Provided dedicated interpreters to ensure young people can access external activities e.g. Duke of Edinburgh Award
  • Ensured pupils in hardship can access enjoyable and enriching activities e.g. Ice skating.
  • Provided additional staffing and interpreters to ensure young people can access local mental/emotional health services.
  • Through the provision of Sign therapy to support the child’s development of communication through sign.
  • Provided mobility training for pupils with multi-sensory impairment.
  • Provided physiotherapy for pupils with physical difficulties.

 

These strategies and interventions are implemented to support the pupils in closing the gap with their peers in terms of their communication and curriculum access and achievement. The strategies were generated through analysis of assessment data and the identification of barriers to learning determined through annual reviews and pupil progress meetings.
We anticipate that as a consequence of these strategies and interventions, pupils for whom the Pupil Premium applies will make at least expected progress and preferably above expected progress relative to their peers.

How we measure effectiveness

The effectiveness of the interventions funded through the Pupil Premium are measured primarily through performance in specific areas of the curriculum (Maths, English, History etc.). Some of the ways we measure improvement are:

  • Improved interaction with other children.
  • Improved achievements (from previous measures) in curriculum subjects.
  • Improved literacy skills and reading ability both in terms of accuracy and
  • Improved communication skills
  • Improved emotional wellbeing and resilience

 

Expenditure last year 2015-16

The total student population of the school at the end of 2015–16 was 68. Of these pupils:

8 (11.8%) were eligible for free school meals
1 (1.5%) have parents who are in the armed forces
1 (1.5%) were Looked after Children

Of the children and YP who attended HLSC in 2015-16, 10 received Pupil Premium. The total amount of money allocated to the school in 2014 – 2015 was £8,980.

Following an assessment of the needs of the individual pupils together with our desire to implement a sharper focus on the progress of vulnerable pupils, we focused our interventions on a number of areas. We included interventions in curriculum, care and emotional wellbeing in order to address the needs of the whole child and promote educational achievement. We spent the money in the following ways:

  • We identified social and emotional wellbeing as a development area across the school and we have used PP to maintain the amount of support in this area. (Approx cost: £1,000)
  • We provided intensive and additional support, in Care, to a child who experienced significant emotional difficulties (Approx cost: £2,500)
  • We provided additional literacy support via speech and language therapy assistant to six PP pupils where this was assessed as a weakness across the curriculum. (Approx cost: £4,000)
  • Play therapy have been successfully piloted at the school to support emotional wellbeing and reduce the number of emotional outbursts occurring during the extended school day. This has continued into the new academic year (Approx cost: £1,000)
  • We continue to provided physiotherapy to one PP pupil to improve mobility. (Approx cost: £1,000)

These interventions were implemented to support the pupils in closing the gap with their peers in terms of their communication and curriculum access and achievement. The strategies were generated through analysis of assessment data and the identification of barriers to learning determined through annual reviews and pupil progress meetings.

As a result of these interventions we have seen a consistent continuation of progress for pupils receiving the pupil premium. We recognise this group to be vulnerable to poor progress. We have ensured, through deployment of Pupil Premium funding, that they make at least expected progress and in some cases above.

The impact of the spending on pupils for whom the pupil premium was paid

The table below shows the progress of the seven pupils in School eligible for the pupil premium compared with the rest of the School. The charts below show progress across all subjects taught at Hamilton Lodge. The data below excludes the three Further Education students allocated PP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further Education (FE) students have received support specifically aimed at sustaining progress in their chosen course and developing independence skills. Interventions include allocation of a personal budget and driving lessons. FE students also access emotional support independently and PP funding has enlarged the service to accommodate this need.

The implementation of strategies and interventions related to pupil premium expenditure has contributed to these positive outcomes for pupils in the school who are eligible for free school meals and/or are in the care.

Funding for the year 2016-17

The total student population of the school in 2016-17 is 63; this number is set to rise towards the end of the academic year. Of these pupils:

5 (7.9%) are eligible for free school meals
1 (1.6%) have parents who are in the armed forces
1 (1.6%) are Looked after Children

The number of pupils eligible for Pupil Premium has fallen from 10 to 7. The funding for Pupil Premium in 2016-17remains fixed at £935 per pupil receiving Free School Meals (FSM); funding for pupils where the parent is a member of the Armed Forces also remains the same at £300. Funding for Looked After Children (LAC) has risen this year from £1,200 to £1,900. This means the total amount of money allocated to the school this year has fallen to £6,875. This may rise if new intake pupils reach the threshold for Pupil Premium.

We will continue to apply the same rigorous scrutiny of the progress of our pupils who attract Pupil Premium. We will apply focused interventions to support accelerated progress to ensure these pupils reach their full potential.

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